Archive for the ‘Culture’ Category

Graceful Aging

July 26, 2018

(Following is a summary of my talk to my ex-classmates of IISc, Bangalore, in the golden reunion, Swarna Sammilana, of the class of 1967, held during December 2017.)

Time and tide stops for none. We have gone through our times – good, bad and ugly. Now we have reached a stage where we have no obligations to anybody, no regret of anything and nothing much to prove. This is the stage where we need to age gracefully.

We need to take care of three important aspects of our life to be able to enjoy the time left with us as of today. They are: our health, our wealth and our dignity.

HEALTH

Health is primary requirement for our happiness. 50% of our health complaints originate due to our age. As our body ages all parts of our body struggles to keep up to their routine. We develop age related deficiencies such as Hernia, Cataract, Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar etc. Mind you, these are not deceases; these are just the results of aging. They become deceases when we neglect them.

Another 30% of our health problems are due to our life styles – like sedate life, bad food habits, lack of sleep etc. Another 10% of our complaints originate from emotional and psychosomatic reasons – arising from spouse and partners, from parents and children, from in-laws and out-law’s and from one’s own self assumed failures. Finally it leaves only 10% of all health problems, coming perhaps out of genetic reasons and/or unexplained stroke of bad luck – which you have to just accept and undergo medical attention and treatment.

For a graceful and happy aging, just attend to the normal aging problems like Hernia, Cataract etc well in time. BP can be easily controlled and managed by effective medicines and by changing your life style and food habits. Do not also worry about your cardio vascular deficiencies too much. It is normal at old age for the arteries to thicken and there are effective drugs to keep this process under safe levels. With a good routine of exercises and healthy food even blood sugar can be controlled with the limited use of drugs. These are definitely not life-threatening.

We have a dilemma when we respond to our body reactions – when we should see a doctor and when we should not? If you have a family doctor, he knows your body well and generally he gives proper advice. Otherwise, it is left to us to decide when to approach a doctor and which doctor. In these days of specialisation, general physicians have become a rare commodity. It is always best to have the first approach to the same doctor every time as he will know our health history better. Another dilemma we have – when to involve others close to us in our health issues? It is good to keep your spouse aware of all your health problems and also for you to be aware of your spouse’s. Involving others should be done selectively and judiciously.

WEALTH

We have had the best of our career in our chosen profession and have earned and saved enough wealth to take care of ourselves and our dependents. We should have proper financial planning which should include apart from our own day to day living expenses, our enjoyment and charity and also to cover contingencies of accident and medical expenses. Most of us who have retired from private services may not have pensions, pay revisions and medical coverage and hence should go in for Medical Insurance. These days such medical insurance policies have become very expensive especially for people above 70 years. If you have already supported your children to be educated and get settled in life, there is no need to leave any legacy specifically for them to inherit. In fact many of our children say openly, not to save anything for their future which they are confident, they will take care of. Still if you think you can spare some of your wealth for gifting to them, better do it now, so that you can feel happy to see them get the benefits of your legacy. After such gifts to them, you will also feel free of your responsibility and enjoy the rest of your wealth on your own. This is the time for involving your spouse in all your financial planning, if you have not doen already. Ladies, please, take interest in the finances of your family together, at least for the sake your husband’s peace of mind. One of us partners will have to leave first and the other one will have to manage alone for the rest of the time.  Better make a will to leave your children with good mutual affection. Involve a neutral third party if felt needed. You have earned enough and, ‘NOW’ is the time to enjoy your wealth, when you are physically able-enough. If not now, when?

DIGNITY

If you take good care of your Health and Wealth, your Dignity is generally assured. When you are together with your spouse, each can take care of other’s dignity. But when you become single at some point of time, you should take particular care of your dignity and self-respect. It is better to prepare for such an eventuality from now itself.

In whosoever care you are in (or planning to be in), you should always try to be of some help to them and get as less dependent on them as possible for your daily routines. You should always accept the changing times and should not impose your values on them.

GENERAL

There are several ways to enjoy your life without much financial, physical or mental strain. Try to update yourself with latest trends in fashion, food habits. Always have something to do: A hobby or something close to your heart. You may learn a game or a language. Keep your friendships alive. Read books. You may try and contact your old classmates or your long lost cousin. Attend marriages of children of your relatives, friends and neighbours. Enjoy your food. Have any food you like – but less often if it does not suit you. Do yoga, walking or some physical exercise for atleast 30 minutes a day. Get spiritual  (not necessarily relegious) and do meditate often.  Keep all your physical aids in good condition – like Hearing aids, Spectacles, Walking Sticks. Keep all your routine medicines easily accessible. Try and keep a diary and maintain to-do-lists even for your daily activities. Keep company with as many youngsters as possible.

Wishing you all senior citizens a very happy retired life with your spouse, care taker, relatives and friends. Let us all age gracefully, with good health, adequate wealth and enhanced dignity. Bye for now.

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The Shrine of Death – By Divya Kumar

July 24, 2018

 

A Book Review

 

Shrine of Death

The Shrine of Death 
Kumar, Divya; Paperback (331 pp)
Published by Bloomsbury India (2018)

 

Congratulations to Divya Kumar for her first ever novel, (really?). The narration is so smooth and natural it is hard to believe it is her first novel. The suspense and mystery is maintained till the very end. Set in locales of Chennai city, the mood of the comparatively slow paced city is brought out well in dialogues. The professional and private lifestyle of neo-liberated women of India is well reflected in the narration. It was nice to know some of the historical perspectives of sculptures of Chola period. The mystery of the concerned sculptures is maintained well throughout. However, as a reader, one feels, some more intrigues could have been built into this mystery to kindle further interest in the topic, and perhaps, to enhance the scope for a sequel. One could have also used a few pictures to show an ancient Temple and with a few bronze idols of Chola period. The novel gains good momentum, after about 80 pages, when the super cop Gerard Ratnaraj appears on the scene. The linking of disappearance of a fiery young historian, Sneha, to the idol theft could also have been brought out more dramatically. Occult powers of Jai and the circumstances which led to the revelation of such powers in him are quite interesting and could have even been developed as a strong second track. Flashback of Prabha could have been given more elaborately. Tamil accented language is used quite effectively to bring out the respective characters alive. Overall it was a good read and augurs well for Divya’s progress as a story teller. CONGRATS, Divya!

 

L V Nagarajan

23 July 2018

 

 

 

 

Innovative Ideas 10, 11, 12 and 13

July 21, 2018

In my first write-up under “Innovative Ideas”, I have proposed how Electric cars can be made affordable by making Batteries as replaceable like Gas cylinders for domestic use. Then in the 2nd write-up “Innovative Ideas 2, 3, 4 and 5”, I have proposed an elevator system with helical rails, a Number Lock with increased security, a Room Air Conditioner with a cool box and lastly, a Gym Charger. In the third write-up  “Innovative Ideas 6, 7, 8, and 9”, I have given my innovative ideas for improvement of passenger convenience in the vast Railways network of India. I hvae already sent them to our efficient Railway Minister Mr. Piyush Goel. You may see these ideas elsewhere in my Blogs. In the present write-up, the 4th in the series, I have given my ideas in several different areas benefitting the citizens in general.

Idea 10 – Elections Eligibility Test (EET)

We are all very much concerned about the quality of candidates contesting various elections and the quality of elected people to Parliament, Assemblies and Local Bodies. My suggestion to improve the situation will be to devise an Elections Eligibility Test (EET). Taking this test may be made voluntary initially. Association for Democratic Reforms (ADR) may devise such tests for different levels of governance. (more…)

Adik Maas in Luni-Solar Calendars of India

June 10, 2018

I am not sure how many of my readers are aware that we are in the 13th month of the Hindu luni-solar calendar. Though this is only the third month of this current Hindu Luni-Solar calendar, this month (from 16th May 2018 to 13th June 2018) is an extra month, called Adik-Jyeshta, and eventually we will have 13 months during this year in this luni-solar Hindu calendar. From 14th June 2018, we will have the 4th month of Luni-Solar Vilambi year and it will be called as Nija-Jyeshta. The current luni-solar year will range from on 18th March 2018 to 6th April 2019 (i.e. totally 384 days).  The names of the 13 months of current Vilambi year are:

Chaitra, Vaisaka, Adik-Jyeshta, Nija-Jyeshta, Ashada, Sravana, Bhadrapada, Aasvina, Karthika, Margasira, Pausha, Magha, Phalguna.

But why 13 months and 384 days are in this year? We are all aware that lunar months are based on the lunar cycle of 29.53 days between two new moons. An ‘Amanta’ lunar month ends on the new moon day and a new month begins on the next day. (Ama-anta: Ending in Amavasya, the New moon). Hence normally the lunar year will be of 354 days. This is 11 days short of a normal solar year. Hence, to synchronise with Solar year, approximately every third year an extra month (adik Maas) of 29.53 days is added making a year of 384 days. On an average, Adik Maas (or extra month) comes once in 2 years and 8.5 months. A lunar month is given the same name as the solar month in which the new moon occurs signalling the end of the lunar month. Since a solar month is generally of 30 days or more, there are occasions when two new moons occur within a solar month, one at the start and the other at the end. This results in the particular solar year having 13 new moons, instead of normal 12. This accounts for the 13th month or Adik-Maas (extra month). The lunar month starting on the first new moon of this solar month is designated as Adik-Maas with the same name as the next month with an adjective ‘Adik’ or extra. The next lunar month starting after 2nd new moon of the solar month, will also  have the same name, but with adjective ‘Nija’ or real.

During the current solar year of Vilambi, you may observe two new moon days in the second solar month of Vaikasi, (Rishaba or Vaisaka), one on 1st of Vaisaka (15th May 2018) and another one on 30th of Vaisaka (13th June 2018). Hence we have two months of Jyeshta named as Adik-Jyeshta, Nija-Jyeshta. Adik-Jyeshta Amavsasya is occurring in Solar month of Vaisaka itself as extra amavasya, and Nija-Jyeshta  Amavsaya, in Aani, Mithuna or Jyeshta Maasa. Please refer Tamil ‘Pambu’ Panchangam.

Similarly, a few of the shorter solar months of 29 days, (as in Margazhi, Paush and Magh), may, very rarely, not have any new moon at all. Such a solar month is known as ‘Kshaya maas’ or defective month. When this happens there will generally be two Adik maases, one in the month prior to, and another in the month subsequent to kshaya Maas. If Paush happens to be kshaya maas, then Kartika and Phalgun will have two Amavasyas each. Then the sequence will be, Adik Kartika, Nija-Kartika, Margasira, Magh, Adik-Phalgun, Nija-Phalgun. Lunar month of Paush will not exist at all and the year still having 13 months.

I have discussed only about Luni-Solar ‘Amanta’ calendar widely followed in South India and Maharashtra. A major variation of this is known as “Purnimanta calendars”, (purnima-anta: ending in Pournami, Full moon), which are followed in most of the Hindi belt in North India. It generally follows the same principle, including the names of the months. Following is an interesting point to note. Purnimanta months are named after the star that is brightest and closest to the moon, on the full moon day. Amanta calendar also adopted the same names.  Same names were adopted by the Solar system also, in addition to the names of the zodiac. In fact Kerala still go by Rasi names only for the solar months.

In the appendix, I have given a list of Regional Varieties of the Indian Calendars, as given by Helmer Aslaksen and Akshay Regulagedda.

The Government of India set up a committee to reform our calendars in 1955 with the renowned physicist Meghnad Saha as its chairman. The committee recommended, among other things, that the Indian Solar year should start on March 22, the vernal equinox, and the first month should be called Chaitra. It was adopted, with a lot of fanfare, as The Indian National Calendar known as ‘Saka Varsh’ in 1957. But the Union Govt under Sri Jawahar Lal Nehru failed to respect the existing system which was also based on scientific observations and principles. Our existing almanacs were described as “encyclopaedia of errors, superstitions and half truths”. Hence Saka calendar failed to take off. (Satyam Bhruyat, Priyam Bhruyat !!!) Even the current universal Gregorian calendar proposed in 1582 CE got adopted by England only in 1752 CE. But then, it was proposed by Pope Gregory, not by any Govt order.

Ref:

  1. Tamil Pambu Panchngam – விளம்பி வருஷ வாக்கிய பஞ்சாங்கம்
  2. Regional Varieties of the Indain Calendars –http://www.math.nus.edu.sg/aslaksen/calendar/indian_regional.html
  3. Names of the Months in the Indian Calendars   http://www.math.nus.edu.sg/aslaksen/calendar/indian_months.html
  4. Medieval mistake – by Biman Nath :FRONTLINE, Vol. 25 – 06 : Mar. 15-28, 2008;    http://www.frontline.in/static/html/fl2506/stories/20080328250610000.html

Appendix:

From: http://www.math.nus.edu.sg/aslaksen/calendar/indian_regional.html

Regional Varieties of the Indian Calendars

 by:  Helmer Aslaksen and Akshay Regulagedda

State   Calendar   New Year
Andhra Pradesh   Southern amanta   One day after the last new Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Goa   Southern amanta   One day after the last new Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Karnataka   Southern amanta   One day after the last new Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Maharashtra   Southern amanta   One day after the last new Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Gujarat   Western amanta   One day after Deepavali
Gujarat – Kathiawar   Western amanta   Ashaadha S 1
Bihar   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Chattisgarh   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Delhi   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Haryana   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Himachal Pradesh   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Jammu and Kashmir   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Jharkhand   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Madhya Pradesh   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Uttaranchal   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Uttar Pradesh   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Rajasthan   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Punjab   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Punjab – Nanakshahi   (Solar) Sidereal; fixed relative to Gregorian calendar   14th March
Tamil Nadu   Solar   The Mesha samkranti
Kerala   Solar   Simha samkranti
Orissa   Solar   The Mesha samkranti
Assam   Solar   Solar day after the Mesha samkranti
Tripura   Solar   Solar day after the Mesha samkranti
West Bengal   Solar   Solar day after the Mesha samkranti

Note: The table is exhaustive neither in terms of calendars nor in terms of states. Arunachal Pradesh, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Sikkim were left out.

 

 

Innovative Ideas 6, 7, 8 and 9

May 2, 2018

Ideas for Indian Railways

In my earlier write-up under “Innovative Ideas”, I have proposed how Electric cars can be made affordable by making Batteries as replaceable like Gas cylinders for domestic use. Then in the 2nd write-up I have proposed an Elevator System with helical rails, a Number Lock  with increased security, a Room Air Conditioner with a cool box and lastly, a Gym Charger. You may see these ideas elsewhere in my Blogs. In the present write-up, the third in the series, I am giving my innovative ideas for the improvement of passenger convenience in our vast Railways network in India. I hope to send this to our efficient Railway Minister Mr. Piyush Goel.

6.0 Railway Reservation

In India, Railways is one of the most preferred and popular mode of travel between cities and towns. Since it is the most energy efficient mode of mass transport, the Indian Government is rightly giving high importance to this and offering a lot of incentives to promote its use. For the last few years I am observing a very disturbing trend which results in considerable inconvenience to genuine travelers and a loss of revenue for Railways. The amount of last-day-cancellations is on the increase. For example, last December I was travelling from Bengaluru to Chennai by morning Shatabdi express. I was wait-listed and my reservation was confirmed only late on the previous day of my travel. When I came to the train, I found our carriage was almost 2/3rd empty. I thought it may get filled up at the next Bengaluru Cantonment Station. But it still remained half-empty. When I enquired with a co-passenger, he said this is the normal occupancy or slightly less on the particular day. It is apparently due to multiple bookings or safety bookings, mainly by software engineers travelling very frequently between Chennai and Bengaluru. They book multiple tickets 3 months in advance by default, and as the travel day approaches they review their need to travel and cancel the trip with minimum loss. Since the seats become vacant in the last moments, there are no takers, who are ready to travel at such short notice. This happens almost in all express trains between cities causing, as told earlier, considerable inconvenience to genuine travelers and a loss of revenue for Railways. There is very simple solution as suggested below:

Booking Window:

  • Open only 30% of seats for reservation 3 months or 90 days, in advance of travel date
  • Open the next 30% of seats (+ unsold tickets of earlier quota) for reservation 60 days in advance of travel date
  • Open the next 30% of seats (+ unsold tickets of earlier quotas) for reservation 30 days in advance of travel date
  • Last 10% will be the Tatkal quota to be opened only 3 days in advance of travel date

You may compare this with the present practice of opening all the 90% at one stroke 90 days in advance. On very popular and crowded routes the 90% quota will be exhausted in the first 2 or 3 days. Any genuine traveler, who plans his journey, even 8o days in advance, will have to wait for 77 days before going for Tatkal booking. This will force him to think of other modes of transport.

Cancelling Window:

  • Anyone who cancels his reservation within 30 days of his booking, or 30 days in advance of his travel date, whichever is earlier, will get 100% refund including reservation charges. Only a nominal service charge of Rs 10 or so could be billed to him.
  • Anyone who cancels his reservation, between 29 days and 15 days in advance of his travel date will get 100% refund excluding reservation charges plus a nominal service charge.
  • Anyone who cancels his reservation, between 14 days and 5 days in advance of his travel date will get 75% refund excluding reservation charges plus a nominal service charge.
  • Anyone who cancels his reservation, between 4 days and 3 hours in advance of his travel date/time will get 50% refund excluding reservation charges plus a nominal service charge.
  • Anyone who cancels his reservation, between 3 hours in advance of his travel date or a few minutes after departure of train, will get only 25% refund excluding reservation charges plus a nominal service charge.
  • Any cancellation later than the above windows will get refunds at the discretion of Railway Superintendent of the respective stations.
  • After such cancellations as above, the vacated bookings should be allotted to the next passengers in the waiting list immediately at every stage, so that they have adequate time to prepare for their travel.

You may again compare this with present practice. Now even if somebody knows well enough that he will not be travelling on the booked date, he waits upto72 hours before departure of the train before cancelling the tickets. Resale of this ticket in such a short notice will not happen and eventually Railway loses a customer. With computerized booking, such intelligent choices are very easy and efficient to implement.

Hope Indian Railways considers my suggestion as above.

7.0 Bridging Platforms:

In Indian Railways, recently they have realized the tremendous advantages of double discharge platforms on either side of the train. Such double discharge platforms are being implemented in all major railway stations and terminuses. The idea of double discharge platforms relieves the passengers with the stress of deciding which side, to be ready with the luggage, to disembark from the train. Another stress for the travelling public is to crossover to the exit of the stations, or to another platform for catching a connecting train, using over bridges or under passes. With several luggages and along with family and kids it is always stressful. Here is my idea to improve this situation:

  • Provide retractable bridges between the platforms over the railway lines at three places across the length of the platform – at both ends and in the middle.
  • The bridges can be retracted as the train arrives at (or runs through) the particular track with required safety features like interlocked signaling, bells, lamps and whistles.
  • This may not be practicable in very busy stations with frequent arrival of trains. In such stations escalators and elevators are a must.

This will greatly avoid the risk of fatalities occurring during illegal line-crossing which happens too frequently in India.

8.0 Train Toilet – 1

There are many problems with toilets in train: Cleanliness, Wetness, convenience, washing facilities, safety grips etc. In addition when the trains are halted in a station, yard or on a loop-line, use of toilets makes the station more dirty, unhealthy and unsightly. Of course there is a notice of request to the passengers not to use the toilets when the train is halted at stations. But the rule is rarely adhered to. Here is a solution at least for the last mentioned problem.

  • Toilets should be prevented from usage when the train is not moving,
  • To do this we may use an intelligent movement sensor to be interlocked with the toilet latch
  • When the train slows down to a very low speed, preparatory to halting, the movement sensor will lock the latch to prevent opening from outside. Anyone using the toilet will be able to open the latch from inside to let himself out. But as he closes the door, the latch will again get interlocked with the movement sensor.
  • As the train picks up speed, the latch will get decoupled from the interlock and get released for opening from outside.
  • The maintenance staff can be provided with a special key to open the toilet even when interlocked, for cleaning and maintenance.

9.0 Train Toilet – 2

All 2-Tier, 3–Tier and Chair-car carriages have totally 4 toilets, 2 each at the respective two ends. It may be better to convert 2 of them (one each from either end, into one male and one female urinal). Urinals are more frequently used, easier to clean and require less space, by accommodating both urinals in the space of one toilet. It will make it easier to keep the toilets clean.

However one major problem is with the solid refuse of the toilets. In most of the trains these toilets discharge waste through an opening, onto the track area itself. This corrodes the track fittings and risks the hygiene of track workers and inspectors. Here is my solution to this problem:

  • It could be better to compact the solid refuse in the under carriage of the train itself.
  • These compacted solid refuse stored in exchangeable drums can be replaced as a part of train cleaning and maintenance process at the terminal stations, or even in a designated cleaning stopovers en-route.
  • These drums of solid refuse can be used as bio-fuel and fertilizer for various applications
  • For safety of conservancy workers, we may automate the process suitably, (eg) auto-sealing of the waste drums as they remove them, integrated cleaning sprays for the toilet discharge area etc.

I Hope these ideas get considered seriously enough. They may be suitably engineered to increase the passenger convenience and safety many fold.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tamil – Class: 5 / Teaching Tamil Through English

April 9, 2018

Class-5

Generally people ask a question, “Why should we learn Tamil?”  In my younger days I asked a similar question, “Why should I learn Sanskrit?” But I was forced to learn Sanskrit, being born as a Brahmin. In my native state of Tamil Nadu, India, Sanskrit is looked up on as a sign of Brahmanism and hence there was not much encouragement. Even in Schools, facility for learning this language was very minimal and insufficient. Hence I had to drop the option of learning this language at some stage. But now I regret I have not learnt a language which contains most of ancient Indian knowledge of Science, Philosophy and Religion. Tamil is also an equally ancient Indian language with a rich treasure of Literature, Science and Cultural History. It is a source of one of the ancient medical practice called Sidda System of Medicines, totally encoded in verses of mystical poetry. With the knowledge of Tamil as a classical language decaying all over, now it needs a learned interpreter to understand and use this system safely. In my younger days in my village, I have heard these verses being recited by our family Native-Physician (Nattu Marutthuvar – நாட்டு மருத்துவர்).  Luckily the present Indian Government is encouraging the knowledge of native Sciences and Technologies, and hence, facilities for study and practice of this system are taken up seriously.

When you know Tamil as a spoken language, it is only a small step to learn the same to read, write and teach the youngsters the great language of Tamil.

We have seen in the earlier 4 classes in this series, the Alphabets, pronunciations, a few words and a brief history of Tamil Language. Now let us proceed to CLASS – 5.

Let us now make a few simple sentence

1. Un(nudaiya) peyar enna? – En peyar Tara

உன்(னுடைய) பெயர் என்ன? – என்(னுடைய) பெயர் தாரா.

What is your Name? – My Name is Tara

2. Idhu yaar? – Idhu en(nudaiya) appa

இது யார்? – இது என்(னுடைய) அப்பா.

Who is this? – This is my father

3. Un amma engey? – En amma veetil irukkiraar

உன் அம்மா எங்கே? – என் அம்மா வீட்டில் இருக்கிறார்.

Where is your mother? – My mother is at home

4. IvaL un thangaiya? – Illai, IvaL en Akka, Mili.

இவள் உன் தங்கையா? – இல்லை, இவள் என் அக்கா, மிலி.

Is she your younger sister? – No, she is my elder sister, Mili.

(Peyar– பெயர்- Name,  Appa- அப்பா-Father,

Amma– அம்மா- Mother, Veedu – வீடு – Home,

Thangai – தங்கை – younger sister, Akka – அக்கா – elder sister,

Illai – இல்லை – No)

 

Now let us learn a few famous poetic expressions in Tamil

Name of the poet is also given.

  • OnRe Kulam, Ourvane Devan – Tirumular

ஒன்றே குலம், ஒருவனே தேவன். – திருமூலர்

(There exists) Only one Community and only one God

  • Annalum NOkkinAn avaLum NOkkinAL – Kavi Chakravarthi Kambar

அண்ணலும் நோக்கினான், அவளும் நோக்கினாள்.

– கவிச்சக்கரவர்த்தி கம்பர்

He glanced at her, and, She returned the glance

  • Chinnan chiru KiLiye, KannammA, Selva Kalanjiyame! –

– Maha Kavi Subramania Bharathiyar

சின்னஞ்சிறு கிளியே, கண்ணம்மா, செல்வக் களஞ்சியமே

– மஹா கவி சுப்பிரமணிய பாரதி

Oh pretty little Parrot, Kannamma (Darling)!

Oh the store house of my prosperity!

  • Tamizhukkum amudhenRu pe(y)r – Kavignar Bhrathi Dasan

தமிழுக்கும் அமுது என்று பேர் – கவிஞர் பாரதிதாசன்

Nectar is also the name for Tamil Language (of same sweetness)

  • KuRai Onrum Illai MaRai Murthy Kanna, MuRai onRum illai Govinda – Rajaji

குறை ஒன்றும் இல்லை, மறை மூர்த்தி கண்ணா

முறை ஒன்றும் இல்லை, கோவிந்தா – ராஜாஜி

No Wants at all Krishna, the lord of all scriptures

 (and, no) not even one complaint, Govinda! (the God)

  • KAlangaliL avaL vasantham, Kalaigalile aval Oviyam –

– Kaviarasu Kannadasan

காலங்களில் அவள் வசந்தம், கலைகளிலே அவள் ஓவியம்

                                                     – கவியரசு கண்ணதாசன்

Among seasons, she is (like) Spring;

Among arts she is (like a) Painting.

  • Kannukku Mai Azhagu, Kavithaikku Poi azhagu –

Kavignar Vairamuthu

கண்ணுக்கு மை அழகு, கவிதைக்கு பொய் அழகு

கவிஞர் வைரமுத்து

Eye shades – beauty to the eye(s);

Lie adds beauty to the poetry.

 

Let us learn a few typical phrases in Tamil

கிட்டத்தட்ட – Kitta-tthatta – Approximately

ஏறத்தாழ     –  ERa-ththAzha – More or less

குத்துமதிப்பாக – kutthu mathippAga – as a rough estimate

சுமாரா – sumAra – fairly (close to)

Now a few words with twin syllables:

பளபள – paLa paLa – Shining

சிலுசிலு – Silu Silu – Very Cold

விடுவிடு – vidu vidu – double fast

வழுவழு – vazhu vazhu – Slippery

Just before closing this lesson, let me give you some sentences using a few of the above words:

1. அவனுடைய சம்பளம்  கிட்டத்தட்ட மாதம் ரூபாய் நூறாயிரம்.

Avanudaiya sambaLam kitta thatta mAdham rupai noorAiyiram

His salary will be approximately Rs 100,000 per month

2. அவனுடைய எடை சுமாரா எண்பது கிலோ இருக்கும்

Avanudaiya edai sumArA eNpathu kilo irukkum

His weight may be fairly close to Eighty Kgs

3. சிலுசிலு என்று காற்று வீசுகிறது.

silu silu endru KAtru veesukirathu

Very cold wind is blowing

4. பார்த்து, தரை வழுவழுப்பாக இருக்கிறது

pArthtu, tharai vazhu vazhuppaga irukkirathu

Look out, The floor is slippery.

We come to the end of Lesson 5. In lesson 6 we will try a paragraph of Tamil Text. We will also learn some more useful words.

 

 

Spirituality and Patriotism in National Politics

March 24, 2018

There is a general feeling, promoted and attempted to be perpetuated, by leftists and the so-called liberals, that Indian Nationalists in the form of BJP/RSS have hijacked Swamy Vivekananda and Subash Chandra Bose as their icons of Spirituality and Patriotism. It is nice that these people at least agree that Swami Vivekananda and Sri Subash Chandra Bose are the Indian idols representing India’s Spiritual and Patriotic traditions. The thought and Sloka attributed by these leftists to Swami Vivekananda, as the evidence of his ‘secular’ and ‘pluralistic’ ideas, is actually the essence of Hindu thought and their way of living. The Sloka   “Aakashath Pathitham Thoyam Yatha Gachathi Sagaram, Sarvadeva Namaskaram Keshavam Prathi Gachathi”, is an ancient well known principle enshrined in every Hindu mind, even before the time of Swami Vivekananda. (Just as the rains falling from the sky, gets back to the sea; Prayers to all the different gods gets  back to the supreme GOD, Kesahav or Maha Vishnu)  This is one of the very first prayers taught to every child of devout Hindu parents. Most of the world religions have accepted this principle, that there is only one God, identified by different names and forms. As Hindus, we already have many deities, from forms to formless, from animals to trees and from five elements to stars and planets. We intrinsically know that all of them will lead to same Godhood. This principle was kept hi-jacked by the secular leftists, if at all, and it has recently been released and made known to their followers, emulating Swami Vivekananda. How can anyone say that the present regime is discouraging the above thought by projecting (or hijacking) Swami Vivekananda? Is it not totally illogical? When Vivekananda and his thoughts were easily available for all, where is the need for anyone to hijack?

Once I had a school mate (Mr. Abdul Subhan) with whom I used to exchange tiffins, of course, on days when he brings vegetarian food. In due course, just as a token of our friendship, he almost always brought vegetarian tiffin to be able to exchange with me every day. Eventually he became a vegetarian even at home on his own accord. Vegetarianism and Veganism are healthy modes of eating practices recognised all over the world. There is nothing spiritual or religious about it. By promoting vegetarianism one is not promoting Hindu religion and by promoting Veganism neither she is promoting Jainism. Forcing and fouling food habits either way is not acceptable.      

Spiritualism is beyond religion or culture or eating practices. Many of the so-called atheists and agnostics have displayed several trends of spiritual thinking, not necessarily religious. Spiritually inclined persons, irrespective of their religion (or no-religion) have always displayed better value systems. Such spiritual people with better value systems should be at the helm of all public affairs and especially in politics.

Integrity and Sense of Justice are also in some way spiritual qualities, evolved out of spiritual thinking. It has nothing to do with any religion or patriotism. Patriotism (or loyalty) is a must for certain disciplines of human activity. Though it is commonly called as loyalty, Patriotism is nobler than loyalty, since it involves sacrifice. In the name of global or universal view, our patriots and our soldiers and their selfless sacrifices cannot be insulted.   On the contrary they should be honoured and respected.

How can anyone hi-jack Spirituality and Patriotism, leave alone their idols? Senses of Spirituality and Patriotism are important requirement for any Political System, Political Party and Political Leadership. That is why nations have oath taking ceremonies for elected politicians and they also have National Anthems, Flags and Emblems. Do we not display our patriotism collectively on Independence Day and Republic Day?

If Spirituality and Patriotism are kept out of politics, we will have only mob-ocracy and not democracy.

Tamil – Class: 4 / Teaching Tamil Through English

February 11, 2018

 

Tamil – Class: 4

e have learnt inthe previous three classes, :almost all the alphabets of Tamil Language and also a number of simple Tamil words. We should next aim to make a few simple sentences. To do this we should learn a few more important words and their usages.

Let us know the pronouns in Tamil:

 

Pronouns1.jpg

pronouns2.jpg

Let us also learn some  Questions in Tamil and typical answers for them.

 

Question 1.jpg

Questions 2.jpg

 

 

 

In the next Class-5, we will make a few sentences with the words and usages we have learnt so far.

In the meantime one may get familiar with all those words and usages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

South Indian National Party

January 18, 2018

South Indian National Party
Today (11th March 2017) is the day our Prime Minister Modi and his party, the BJP have scored big wins in UP and Uttarakhand. While one can be happy that Modi and De-mo have eventually won, the size of victory was definitely not expected. Personally I am afraid that this may lead to complacence among the leaders of BJP. In a more narrow sense, I am even afraid this may lead to increased neglect of South India where BJP (and congress) are considerable weak. I have always been thinking we need a strong South India based national political party to offset this neglect. No central government, which is predominantly run by North India based national party, show much interest in solving the problems of the south. It perhaps wants the southern states to be permanently in a state of mutual conflict so that they do not gain much political clout in New Delhi. These North Indian Parties may even feel politically threatened by the unity of southern states. I have listed some of these issues in the following paragraphs. This is precisely the reason why I feel there is a need for a “South Indian National Party”. This party, SINP, should encompass all the southern States namely, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Andhra, Telengana, Goa and Puduchery. In this context, I remember the old suggestion of elder statesman Rajaji, to form a Dakshin Pradesh, as compared to Uttar Pradesh in the North, which eventually developed as power centre in the national politics.

The neglect of south starts from early days of Sri Lankan Tamils conflict in 1960s. SPKF, Liquidation of LTTE, gifting of Kaccha Tivu are all subsequent effects of such neglect. There are several great rivers in the North, flowing through several states and being shared by them in a peaceful manner with proper agreements in place and monitored by the Central Govt. To name a few: Bhakra Management Board for sharing of Sutluj and other rivers among Punjab, Haryana, HP and Rajasthan; Narmada water between Gujarat and MP. But when it comes to south, Central Govt is keeping the following river problems unresolved for many years: Krishna water to Andhra (Almatti Dam issue), Mullai Periyar issue between Kerala and Tamil Nadu, Palar issue between Andhra and Tamil Nadu and finally Cauvery issue between Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. Even after Supreme Court has ruled a solution to this problem, Central Govt is not willing to form a Cauvery Management Board. Recently we have seen the inept handling of Sasikala, Jallikattu and Hydro Carbon issues. Only time we had some unity among the southern states was when, Kamaraj, Nijalingappa, VKRV Rao, C Subramaniam and R Venkatraman were at the helm of affairs in the Congress Party.

Hence I feel the leaders of next generation of politicians in South India, should think of forging an alliance with other such leaders in the other southern states and try and form a South based national party which we may call as “South Indian National Party”. It may propose a unified solution to the problems of South India. Some of their ideals could be:

1. Any inter-state problems should be discussed dispassionately between all the stake holders and propose at least temporary or interim solution which could ward off a permanent state of animosity between the states and its peoples
2. Discuss methods of sharing all the natural resources in a mutually profitable manner
3. Forge a cultural unity among the peoples of southern states. (Music, Dance, Movies and Literature will help a lot in this respect)
4. Impress on the central Govt to have at least one short session of Parliament in the South, say Bengaluru.
5. Arrange for members of legislators of other states to attend the Assembly sessions of any state. We may even invite a few members of Parliament for such sessions. This will promote unity and also familiarity with the problems specific to such state.
6. Last but not the least, there should be mutual respect among the different language groups and cultures.
7. Could promote Southern Tourism in a big way.

Many more ideals could be added after discussion with leaders of different regions.

I am sending this note to several new wave politicians in Southern States to set them thinking on these lines. I wish they will respond and take my idea forward.

L V Nagarajan / 11th March 2017
https://lvnaga.wordpress.com/

Thirukkural – 292

December 3, 2017

Chapter – 30 / Vaaymai/ Verse – 2

பொய்ம்மையும் வாய்மை யிடத்தே – புரைதீர்ந்த

நன்மை பயக்கும் எனின்.

Poymmaiyum vaaymai idatthE – purai theerndha

Nanmai payakkum enin

 

Poymmai(yum) – (Even) a lie

Vaaymai – Oral Integrity or communicative integrity

Purai – harm, crime

Purai Theerndha – Harmless, without criminal intent

Nanmai – Good, comfort, help

Payakkum – Yield, achieve

Nanmai Payakkum enin – If it yields good result of comfort or help.

Even a lie will be acceptable as vocal integrity, if it yields, but without any criminal intent, good result of comfort or help.

This whole chapter No.30 of ten verses speak about ‘Vaaymai’ as a virtue. Saint Tiruvalluvar defines Vaaymai in the first verse of the chapter as ‘any communication which does not bring harm to anyone’.

‘Vaaymai’ does not have a good translation in English. You may roughly call it as vocal (or communicative) integrity.

This Chapter talks about Truthfulness only in the last verse where the saint says ‘Vaaymai’ is better than ‘Meimmai’. He says there is no better truthfulness than communicative integrity.

He talks about Vaaymai in two more verses where he states vaaymai is the best form of penance and charity and it keeps your mind bright and without guilt. At the same time he extols the virtues of ‘Poyyamai’ or being against falsehood, in five verses. He does not at all approve any type of falsehood.

We may compare this with a famous Sanskrit verse of Saint Adi Sankara: “Satyam bruyat priyam bruyat.  Na bruyat satyam apriyam. Priyam cha nanrutam bruyat. Esha dharmah sanatanah.”  Truth is always spoken with kindness. Truth is never spoken in a harsh way. Even with kindness falsehood is not to be spoken. This is the eternal path of virtue.

Here also the saint give preference to Vaaymai than Meimmai, i.e., Communicative integrity than truthfulness.  After all, Tamil Nadu Government’s emblem saying வாய்மையே வெல்லும் (Vaaymai alone triumphs) is right, instead of the usual (Satymeva Jayate) Truth alone triumphs. We may rank these virues as: Poyyamai is the best, Vaaimai is the next and Meimmai is the last.

There is a proverb in Tamil which says “Unnmai Sudum” (உண்மை சுடும்​), Bear Truth Hurts. As per both Adi Sankara and Tiruvalluvar, we should not tell this truth which hurts. (i.e.) if you are unable to tell it in a way it does not hurt. In such a situation where the ‘Truth Hurts’, It is better to tell a lie, provided it does not have any criminal intent. Hence the Titukkural says,

Even a lie is better than the truth if it yields

Haven to a disturbed situation

Bye till the next Tirukkural.