Archive for June, 2018

Adik Maas in Luni-Solar Calendars of India

June 10, 2018

I am not sure how many of my readers are aware that we are in the 13th month of the Hindu luni-solar calendar. Though this is only the third month of this current Hindu Luni-Solar calendar, this month (from 16th May 2018 to 13th June 2018) is an extra month, called Adik-Jyeshta, and eventually we will have 13 months during this year in this luni-solar Hindu calendar. From 14th June 2018, we will have the 4th month of Luni-Solar Vilambi year and it will be called as Nija-Jyeshta. The current luni-solar year will range from on 18th March 2018 to 6th April 2019 (i.e. totally 384 days).  The names of the 13 months of current Vilambi year are:

Chaitra, Vaisaka, Adik-Jyeshta, Nija-Jyeshta, Ashada, Sravana, Bhadrapada, Aasvina, Karthika, Margasira, Pausha, Magha, Phalguna.

But why 13 months and 384 days are in this year? We are all aware that lunar months are based on the lunar cycle of 29.53 days between two new moons. An ‘Amanta’ lunar month ends on the new moon day and a new month begins on the next day. (Ama-anta: Ending in Amavasya, the New moon). Hence normally the lunar year will be of 354 days. This is 11 days short of a normal solar year. Hence, to synchronise with Solar year, approximately every third year an extra month (adik Maas) of 29.53 days is added making a year of 384 days. On an average, Adik Maas (or extra month) comes once in 2 years and 8.5 months. A lunar month is given the same name as the solar month in which the new moon occurs signalling the end of the lunar month. Since a solar month is generally of 30 days or more, there are occasions when two new moons occur within a solar month, one at the start and the other at the end. This results in the particular solar year having 13 new moons, instead of normal 12. This accounts for the 13th month or Adik-Maas (extra month). The lunar month starting on the first new moon of this solar month is designated as Adik-Maas with the same name as the next month with an adjective ‘Adik’ or extra. The next lunar month starting after 2nd new moon of the solar month, will also  have the same name, but with adjective ‘Nija’ or real.

During the current solar year of Vilambi, you may observe two new moon days in the second solar month of Vaikasi, (Rishaba or Vaisaka), one on 1st of Vaisaka (15th May 2018) and another one on 30th of Vaisaka (13th June 2018). Hence we have two months of Jyeshta named as Adik-Jyeshta, Nija-Jyeshta. Adik-Jyeshta Amavsasya is occurring in Solar month of Vaisaka itself as extra amavasya, and Nija-Jyeshta  Amavsaya, in Aani, Mithuna or Jyeshta Maasa. Please refer Tamil ‘Pambu’ Panchangam.

Similarly, a few of the shorter solar months of 29 days, (as in Margazhi, Paush and Magh), may, very rarely, not have any new moon at all. Such a solar month is known as ‘Kshaya maas’ or defective month. When this happens there will generally be two Adik maases, one in the month prior to, and another in the month subsequent to kshaya Maas. If Paush happens to be kshaya maas, then Kartika and Phalgun will have two Amavasyas each. Then the sequence will be, Adik Kartika, Nija-Kartika, Margasira, Magh, Adik-Phalgun, Nija-Phalgun. Lunar month of Paush will not exist at all and the year still having 13 months.

I have discussed only about Luni-Solar ‘Amanta’ calendar widely followed in South India and Maharashtra. A major variation of this is known as “Purnimanta calendars”, (purnima-anta: ending in Pournami, Full moon), which are followed in most of the Hindi belt in North India. It generally follows the same principle, including the names of the months. Following is an interesting point to note. Purnimanta months are named after the star that is brightest and closest to the moon, on the full moon day. Amanta calendar also adopted the same names.  Same names were adopted by the Solar system also, in addition to the names of the zodiac. In fact Kerala still go by Rasi names only for the solar months.

In the appendix, I have given a list of Regional Varieties of the Indian Calendars, as given by Helmer Aslaksen and Akshay Regulagedda.

The Government of India set up a committee to reform our calendars in 1955 with the renowned physicist Meghnad Saha as its chairman. The committee recommended, among other things, that the Indian Solar year should start on March 22, the vernal equinox, and the first month should be called Chaitra. It was adopted, with a lot of fanfare, as The Indian National Calendar known as ‘Saka Varsh’ in 1957. But the Union Govt under Sri Jawahar Lal Nehru failed to respect the existing system which was also based on scientific observations and principles. Our existing almanacs were described as “encyclopaedia of errors, superstitions and half truths”. Hence Saka calendar failed to take off. (Satyam Bhruyat, Priyam Bhruyat !!!) Even the current universal Gregorian calendar proposed in 1582 CE got adopted by England only in 1752 CE. But then, it was proposed by Pope Gregory, not by any Govt order.

Ref:

  1. Tamil Pambu Panchngam – விளம்பி வருஷ வாக்கிய பஞ்சாங்கம்
  2. Regional Varieties of the Indain Calendars –http://www.math.nus.edu.sg/aslaksen/calendar/indian_regional.html
  3. Names of the Months in the Indian Calendars   http://www.math.nus.edu.sg/aslaksen/calendar/indian_months.html
  4. Medieval mistake – by Biman Nath :FRONTLINE, Vol. 25 – 06 : Mar. 15-28, 2008;    http://www.frontline.in/static/html/fl2506/stories/20080328250610000.html

Appendix:

From: http://www.math.nus.edu.sg/aslaksen/calendar/indian_regional.html

Regional Varieties of the Indian Calendars

 by:  Helmer Aslaksen and Akshay Regulagedda

State   Calendar   New Year
Andhra Pradesh   Southern amanta   One day after the last new Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Goa   Southern amanta   One day after the last new Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Karnataka   Southern amanta   One day after the last new Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Maharashtra   Southern amanta   One day after the last new Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Gujarat   Western amanta   One day after Deepavali
Gujarat – Kathiawar   Western amanta   Ashaadha S 1
Bihar   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Chattisgarh   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Delhi   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Haryana   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Himachal Pradesh   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Jammu and Kashmir   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Jharkhand   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Madhya Pradesh   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Uttaranchal   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Uttar Pradesh   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Rajasthan   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Punjab   Purnimanta   One day after the last full Moon before the Mesha samkranti
Punjab – Nanakshahi   (Solar) Sidereal; fixed relative to Gregorian calendar   14th March
Tamil Nadu   Solar   The Mesha samkranti
Kerala   Solar   Simha samkranti
Orissa   Solar   The Mesha samkranti
Assam   Solar   Solar day after the Mesha samkranti
Tripura   Solar   Solar day after the Mesha samkranti
West Bengal   Solar   Solar day after the Mesha samkranti

Note: The table is exhaustive neither in terms of calendars nor in terms of states. Arunachal Pradesh, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Sikkim were left out.

 

 

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